The Revenue Machine: Sales & Marketing Collaboration

February 4, 2019

Creating a revenue machine is key to success; in order to do so, the company’s sales and marketing teams must be in total alignment. By doing so, the teams will constantly communicate with each other, receiving feedback to continuously improve the machine. We asked five top sales and marketing leaders from Chicago about their tips to strengthen collaboration between sales and marketing. Here are their answers:

 

Susmitha Bellam, Director of Sales Planning & Ops at Bitmovin: Sharing a common metric/goal and agreeing on how to measure that goal can help foster collaboration between sales and marketing. At Bitmovin, we're working closely with our marketing colleagues to agree on what we want to achieve and how we're going to measure it. These conversations generate a lot of great ideas and create a common shared vocabulary between the groups.

 

Stephanie Jenkins, VP of SMB Sales at Glassdoor: We have a demand generation meeting once a week with all of our sales and marketing executives to align on the pipeline generation. We cover a variety of topics and work together to triage any areas that need extra marketing attention or resources.

 

George Eliopoulos, Director of Sales at Braintree: The difference between the one-to-many world of marketers and one-to-one world of sales is often a source of disconnect. One method I've used to bridge this gap is to have sales reps present many customer journeys quarterly, highlighting both wins and losses. This gives marketing a view into what really affects a sale and also what the buying process is like from the client's point of view. Marketing's feedback then gives the sales rep appreciation for what it took to get a lead in the nebulous world most marketers have to navigate.

 

Aaron Berkey, Sr. Director of Sales at Torchlite: Torchlite's best practice includes continually testing and questioning our ICP. Unless we all know EXACTLY who we're focused on, speaking to and working with, there is bound to be a disconnect across the effort that marketing is putting into driving leads and the outbound sales success.


Chris Rechtsteiner, VP of Marketing at ServerCentral Turing Group: 1) Regular, informal check-ins to review lead and prospect engagement - both the daily activities and strategic initiatives that are in place. 2) Honest feedback. It's OK for a lead to not be good and for a prospect / opportunity to get sideways. The more clarity there is in the communication around these opportunities, the stronger the relationship between sales & marketing and the better the company will be in the long term.


 

 

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